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April 26th, 1999 Volume 8 No. 6Update on Pest Management and Crop Development

Coming Events & Current Situation
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Scaffolds is published weekly from March to September by Cornell University -- NYS Agricultural Experiment Station (Geneva), and Ithaca -- with the assistance of Cornell Cooperative Extension.

New York field reports welcomed. Send submissions by 3 p.m. Monday to:

Scaffolds Fruit Journal

Editors: A. Agnello, D. Kain

Dept. of Entomology, NYSAES

Geneva, NY 14456-0462

Phone: 315-787-2341 FAX: 315-787-2326

Scaffolds 99 index

 

43F

50F

Current DD accumulations (Geneva 1/1-4/26):

183

69

(Highland 1/1-4/26):

316

134

 

Coming Events:

Ranges:

 

European red mite egg hatch begins

157-358

74-208

Green apple aphid present

127-297

54-156

Green fruitworm flight subsides

170-544

75-280

Lesser appleworm 1st flight

135-651

49-377

Obliquebanded leafroller larvae active

149-388

54-201

Pear thrips in pear buds

137-221

54-101

Pear psylla 1st hatch

111-402

55-208

Redbanded leafroller 1st flight peak

180-455

65-221

Rosy apple aphid nymphs present

91-291

45-148

Spotted tentiform leafminer 1st oviposition

141-319

48-154

Spotted tentiform leafminer 1st flight peak

180-544

65-275

Tarnished plant bug adults active

71-536

34-299

McIntosh at tight cluster

188-279

68-138

Peach at pink

152-269

68-119

Peach at bloom

229-446

95-199

Pear at green cluster

188-282

68-138

Pear at white bud

217-423

96-217

Plum at bud burst

68-234

33-108

Plum at green cluster

170-282

75-138

Sweet cherry at white bud

152-267

75-116

Sweet cherry at bloom

187-326

83-150

Tart cherry at white bud

257-326

109-149

Phenologies (Geneva):

Apple (McIntosh):

Late Half-Inch Green

 

(Delicious):

Half-Inch Green

 

Pear (Bartlett) :

Early Green Cluster

 

Sweet Cherry (Windsor):

Early White Bud

 

Tart Cherry (Montmorency):

Bud Burst

 

Peach:

Early Pink

(Highland): Apple (McIntosh):

Early Pink

 
 

Pear (Bartlett):

Early White Bud

 

Apricot:

Petal Fall

 

Peach:

Late Bloom

 

TRAP CATCHES (Number/trap/day)

       

Geneva:

4/12

4/15

4/19

4/22

4/26

Green Fruitworm

0.3

0.7

0.0

0.2

0.0

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

0.0

0.0

1.4*

135

1.8

Redbanded Leafroller

0.1

5.5

0.1

8.8

1.3

Oriental Fruit Moth

-

-

-

0.5*

0.3

Lesser Appleworm

-

-

-

-

0.0

Highland (Dick Straub, Peter Jentsch):

3/31

4/5

4/12

4/19

4/26

Green Fruitworm

2.0

0.6

0.5

0.0

0.0

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

0.0

<0.1*

2.4

9.1

13.2

Redbanded Leafroller

3.0*

9.7

10.7

20.8

20.2

Oriental Fruit Moth

-

-

-

-

0.2*

Codling Moth

-

-

-

-

0.0

European Red Mite (#/leaf)

-

-

-

-

0.2*

* = 1st catch

PEST FOCUS

Geneva: Oriental Fruit Moth 1st catch, 4/22. Cold weather over the

weekend depressed trap catches

Highland: Apple Rust Mites observed. First motile European Red Mites

observed. Oriental Fruit Moth 1st catch, 4/26.

 

APPLE SCAB UPDATE

(Dave Rosenberger dar22@cornell.edu & Fritz Meyer fwm4@cornell.edu, Plant Pathology, Highland)

Apple scab ascospore counts as determined from squash mounts:

Tower

Date

Location

Immature

Mature

Discharged

Discharge

4/18

Saratoga

90%

10%

0%

18

4/20

Peru

84%

16%

0%

34

4/20

Highland

82%

20%

0%

179

Last week Kevin Iungerman provided leaves from Saratoga and Peru for squash mount assessments. Trees in both locations were between Silver Tip and Green Tip when the samples were collected. In both of those regions, maturity levels were just approaching the point where economically significant discharges can be expected with the next wetting events. Spore maturity appeared slightly more advanced in the Champlain Valley (Peru) than in Saratoga. Ascospore development in the Saratoga area may have been retarded by exceptionally dry conditions that have prevailed in that region. Ascospore maturation can be arrested if the leaf litter that harbors the fungus becomes completely dried out.

In the lower Hudson Valley, scab spores are ready to go but rainfall has been limited. The wetting period that occurred April 15-17 provided the first infection period of the season with 35 hours of wetting at an average temperature of 47°F.

4.26 Diseases