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August 12, 2002 Volume 11 No. 22 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development

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Table of Contents:
UPCOMING PEST EVENTS
PHEROMONE TRAP CATCHES
PEST FOCUS

INSECTS
     New York orchard radar pest predictions
     Late summer insects

 

Scaffolds is published weekly from March to September by Cornell University -- NYS Agricultural Experiment Station (Geneva), and Ithaca -- with the assistance of Cornell Cooperative Extension.

New York field reports welcomed. Send submissions by 3 p.m. Monday to:

Scaffolds Fruit Journal

Editors: A. Agnello, D. Kain

Dept. of Entomology, NYSAES

Geneva, NY 14456-0462

Phone: 315-787-2341 FAX: 315-787-2326

 

Scaffolds 2002 index

Upcoming Pest Events

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects

 

 Current DD accumulations
43°F
50°F
(Geneva 1/1-8/12):

2624

1815

(Geneva 1/1-8/12/2001):

2600

1801

(Geneva "Normal"):

2468

1726

(Highland 1/1-8/12):

3095

2184

 
Coming Events: Ranges:  

Apple maggot flight peak

2033-2843

1387-1953

Codling moth 2nd flight peak

1471-3103

931-2212

Lesser appleworm 2nd flight peak

2169-3328

1464-2359

Obliquebanded leafroller 2nd flight peak

2482-3267

1616-2231

Oriental fruit moth 3rd flight peak

2389-3466

1660-2402

Peachtree borer flight subsides

2230-3255

1497-2309

Redbanded leafroller 3rd flight begins

2389-3113

1722-2209

San Jose scale 2nd flight subsides

2494-3582

1662-2477


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Trap Catches

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects

 

TRAP CATCHES (Number/trap/day)

Geneva        
 

7/29

8/1

8/5

8/12

Redbanded Leafroller

0.3

0.5

0.6

0.1

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

33.5

183

442

171

Oriental Fruit Moth

1.8

0.8

2.9

4.5

Lesser Appleworm

3.0

1.2

3.5

5.2

Codling Moth

1.0

1.0

0.5

0.6

San Jose Scale

14.0

32.0

20.8

3.7

American Plum Borer

2.1

1.7

1.6

0.9

Lesser Peachtree Borer

0.3

1.7

0.9

0.9

Peachtree Borer

1.3

1.0

0.9

0.2

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.3

0.2

0.4

0.1

Apple maggot

0.0

0.2

0.1

0.05

Highland (Dick Straub, Peter Jentsch):

       
 

7/22

7/29

8/5

8/12

Redbanded Leafroller

4.3

0.8

0.9

1.4

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

42.4

57.4

35.6

38.3

Oriental Fruit Moth

1.6

0.9

0.9

0.4

Codling Moth

2.2

3.3

2.9

1.5

Lesser Appleworm

1.9

2.4

0.6

0.7

Tufted Apple Budmoth

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.2

Variegated Leafroller

0.0

0.5

0.6

0.9

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.1

0.6

0.6

0.3

Apple Maggot

0.1

0.4

0.1

0.0

Sparganothis fruitworm

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.8

Fruittree leafroller

0.1*

0.0

0.0

0.0

Dogwood borer

1.3

0.6

0.6

0.1

* = 1st catch

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Pest Focus

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects

 

Geneva: Oriental Fruit Moth and Lesser Appleworm trap catches increasing.

Highland: Stinkbug damage evident in pear border rows.

Aphids building on new growth.

Twospotted Spider Mite numbers above thesholds and Rust Mite numbers increasing.

Oriental Fruit Moth terminal feeding observed.


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Insects

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects

 

ORCHARD RADAR DIGEST

Geneva Predictions:

Codling Moth
CM development as of August 12: 2nd generation adult emergence at 83% and 2nd generation egg hatch at 50%.

Highland Predictions:

Codling Moth
CM development as of August 12: 2nd generation adult emergence at 94% and 2nd generation egg hatch at 74%.

 

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THE HEAT OF THE MOMENT

(Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva)

 

Most of the season's pest control decisions have been made by now, and as growers prepare to make what will probably be their last turn through the orchard for crop protection purposes before seriously addressing harvest activities, here's a quick rundown of some of the more important players to keep in mind for these dog day duties.

Apple Maggot

Catches of adults continue to be quite respectable (even startling) around the state, particularly in sites adjacent to hedgerows, so the dry soil conditions appear not to be hindering their emergence. Mid-August is traditionally still fair game for a decent number of flies to be out and laying eggs, although numbers should begin tapering off a bit soon. This is yet another of those seasons when localized trapping can pay off in the event that some blocks are under greater pressure than others, even on the same farm, so please continue to monitor traps in representative blocks.

Internal Lepidoptera

Trap counts for the 3rd flight of oriental fruit moth continue to be relatively high in many western orchards (both apple and peach), and some varieties of peaches still have a couple of weeks to go before harvest. In our eastern demonstration blocks (Champlain Valley, Capital District, and Hudson Valley), the same scenario is playing out with lesser appleworm (see following photo). as the primary pest.

Pheromone disruption results have been encouraging so far, but the edges of blocks are susceptible to some problematic fruit infestations. Options include Guthion or Imidan or Asana in peaches. In apples and pears, you can use Guthion, Imidan, Avaunt, or Danitol; the last two materials will additionally give control of white apple leafhopper. For control of OFM, alternate row middle applications will not be as effective as whole orchard sprays in high pressure blocks. Assess the pressure in your specific situations, check the pre-harvest intervals, and determine whether a full or border spray might be in order.

European Corn Borer

Recall that these moths have a final flight that extends to the middle of September, and that the offspring can inflict last-minute fruit feeding damage to later varieties. One or two late sprays of a B.t. product like Dipel can go a long ways toward minimizing this injury, and the 0-day PHI is compatible with any harvest schedule. Also, SpinTor applied against late season leafrollers will also provide corn borer control (PHI = 7 days).

Dock Sawfly

The appearance of neat little (2 mm) holes bored into the side of apples in the late summer and early fall, similar in appearance to those caused by a stem puncture, may indicate an infestation of this relatively sporadic pest. Although this insect is a relative of the European apple sawfly, its appearance is quite different; the larva is a bright green worm with a light brown head (see photo), as contrasted with the EAS, which is whitish and feeds on young apples during the petal fall period.

Dock sawfly confines its feeding almost entirely to plants belonging to the buckwheat family (Polygonaceae), including numerous docks and sorrels, the knotweeds and bindweeds, or else wild buckwheat or alfalfa.

The injury to apples consists externally of the small round holes bored by the larvae, which after a few days show a slightly sunken, brownish ring around them and occasionally may be surrounded by a larger discolored halo. These holes may occur anywhere on the surface, but are most numerous around the calyx and stem ends, or at a point where the apple touches a leaf or another apple, since it is easier for the larva to obtain a foothold here. Since the dock sawfly must live on the above-mentioned weeds, it becomes an apple pest only where these plants are growing in or around the orchard. There is little danger from this insect in orchards where the food plants don't exist. Now would be a good time to assess the weed situation in your orchard and make plans for such selective herbicide applications as may be appropriate regarding this insect.

 

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This material is based upon work supported by Smith Lever funds from the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Scaffolds is published weekly from March to September by Cornell University -- NYS Agricultural Experiment Station (Geneva), and Ithaca -- with the assistance of Cornell Cooperative Extension. New York field reports welcomed. Send submissions by 3 p.m. Monday to:

Scaffolds Fruit Journal
Editors: A. Agnello, D. Kain
Dept. of Entomology, NYSAES
P.O. Box 462
Geneva, NY 14456-0462

Phone: 315-787-2341 FAX: 315-787-2326

E-mail: ama4@cornell.edu

Online at <http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ent/scaffolds/>

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