Scaffolds Logo

June 9, 2003 Volume 12 No. 13 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development

Scaffolds Logo

Scaffolds 03 index

Upcoming Pest Events

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Chem News

 Current DD accumulations
43°F
50°F
(Geneva 1/1-6/9):

749

400

(Geneva 1/1-6/9/2002):

822

468

(Geneva "Normal"):

839

480

(Geneva 6/16 Predicted):

911

516

(Highland 1/1-6/9):

972

549

 

Upcoming Pest Events:

Ranges:

 

Codling moth 1st flight peak

547-1326

307-824

European red mite summer eggs hatch

773-938

442-582

Obliquebanded leafroller pupae present

612-860

330-509

Obliquebanded leafroller 1st catch

686-1104

392-681

Pandemis leafroller 1st catch

749-873

423-488

Pear psylla 1st summer adults present

759-864

443-512

Rose leafhopper adults on multiflora rose

668-916

336-519

San Jose scale 1st flight peak

457-461

229-449

Spotted tentiform leafminer 1st flight subsides

489-978

270-636

 


Return to top


 

 

Trap Catches

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Chem News


TRAP CATCHES (Number/trap/day)

Geneva

       
 

5/29

6/2

6/5

6/9

Redbanded Leafroller

1.8

1.0

0.0

0.0

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

46.5

26.9

40.5

18.4

Oriental Fruit Moth

2.5

1.8

5.3

5.4

Lesser Appleworm

1.3

0.3

0.5

0.5

San Jose Scale

1.0*

3.5

2.7

91.9

Codling Moth

0.3

1.3

1.8

2.6

Obliquebanded Leafroller

-

0.0

0.0

0.0

Pandemis leafroller

-

-

0.0

0.0

American Plum Borer

0.3

1.3

0.8

0.4

Lesser Peachtree Borer

-

0.0

0.0

0.3*

Peachtree Borer

-

-

-

0.0

Highland (Dick Straub, Peter Jentsch):

 

5/19

5/27

6/2

6/9

Redbanded Leafroller

3.2

1.4

1.0

0.1

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

12.6

8.2

3.6

2.6

Oriental Fruit Moth

2.5

4.5

0.4

0.6

Lesser Appleworm

-

-

-

1.8

Codling Moth

0.8*

1.1

0.9

0.7

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

* = 1st catch

 

Return to top


 

Pest Focus

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Chem News

 

Geneva: San Jose scale trap catch increasing.
1st Lesser Peachtree Borer caught today, 6/9.

Highland: White Apple Leafhopper and Rose Leafhopper moving into apple.
Rosy Apple Aphid leaf curling damage observed

Return to top


 

Insects

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Chem News

 

ORCHARD RADAR DIGEST

Geneva Predictions:

Roundheaded Appletree Borer
RAB adult emergence begins: June 6; Peak emergence: June 20.
RAB egglaying begins: June 15. Peak egglaying period roughly: July 4 to July 18.

Codling Moth
Codling moth development as of June 9: 1st generation adult emergence at 29% and 1st generation egg hatch at 0%.
1st generation 3% CM egg hatch:  June 16. This is first spray date where multiple sprays needed to control 1st generation CM.
Second spray date if using Imidan, Avaunt, or azinphosmethyl is around June 28. If using Bt insecticide, the optimum initial spray date is June 11. The rain-adjusted second Bt spray date is around June 21, with a third Bt spray around July 1 needed to maintain protection through majority of CM egg hatch period.
1st generation 20% CM egg hatch:  June 23 (= single spray date where one spray needed to control 1st generation codling moth).

Obliquebanded Leafroller
1st generation OBLR flight, first trap catch expected: June 16.

Oriental Fruit Moth
Optimum 1st generation second treatment date, if needed: June 8.
2nd generation OFM flight begins around: July 7.

Redbanded Leafroller
2nd RBLR flight begins: July 8.

San Jose Scale
1st generation SJS crawlers appear:  June 25.

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer
2nd STLM flight begins around: June 22.
Rough guess of when 2nd generation sap-feeding mines begin showing:  July 11.

Return to top

 


 

MODEL BUILDING

Plum Curculio. Heat units are finally beginning to build, and the forecast calls for highs in the upper 70's this week; however, this is definitely one of those seasons when the egg-laying period promises to be prolonged, so growers will need to keep their fruit protected. Our numbers as of today:

Geneva (May 23 PF estimate) - 127
Highland (May 19 PF estimate) - 211
Lafayette (May 23 PF estimate) - 148
Lyndonville (May 28 PF estimate) - 149
North Appleton/Niagara Co. (May 28 PF estimate) - 81
Saratoga/Capital District (May 27 PF estimate) - 160
Sodus (May 27 PF estimate) - 116

Oriental Fruit Moth. The second application against the first brood in both peaches and apples should be applied at approximately 350-375 DD (base 45F) from biofix:

SITE

BIOFIX

CUM DD-45

APPROX. % HATCH

Highland

4/21

651

99%

Geneva

5/1

438

79%

Lyndonville

5/4

431

77%

Albion

5/5

342

52%

N. Appleton

5/6

308

41%

Williamson

5/8

346

53%

 

Codling Moth. These accumulations are also still somewhat behind, but this first brood will likely be taken care of by curculio sprays in most locations. With 250 DD (base 50F) as a first spray date, we currently have:

Geneva (1st catch of May 22) - 133
Highland (1st catch of May 19) - 211
Lafayette (1st catch of May 23) - 148
Lyndonville (1st catch of May 20) - 190
North Appleton/Niagara Co. (1st catch of May 28) - 81
Saratoga/Capital District (1st catch of May 22) - 203



Return to top

 


 

GREEN WRIGGLERS

(Harvey Reissig & Dave Combs, Entomology, Geneva)

 

Obliquebanded leafroller moths have yet to start flying in both the Hudson Valley and in Geneva, but with a week of more seasonal temperatures forecast, we may eventually get back onto a nearly normal schedule for insect activity by mid-month. First hatch is generally assumed to occur from about 300-360 DD (base 43F) after the flight starts, so we'll start updating you each week with values for Highland and Geneva once things get rolling. With some improved pesticide tools now available to NY growers, OBLR management has not appeared to be as much of a challenge recently as it has been in past years, although this pest has not faded entirely into obscurity, and many of the old problem orchards can still be counted on for a reality check if we start to get complacent. Accordingly, a brief synopsis of last year's research efficacy trials might be in order.

Pesticide control programs for the first summer brood of OBLR were conducted in a Wayne Co. orchard in 2002 containing 'Jonagold' and 'Fortune' varieties. Plots were rectangles of eight adjacent rows (approx. 0.25 A) with 6-8 trees in each row. Treatment blocks along with untreated check plots were arranged in a RCB design and replicated twice so that an equal distribution of both varieties were represented in each replicate. Treatments were applied based on estimated DD accumulations (base temp = 43F) after the beginning of the summer flight of adults on 11 Jun. One application was made after an accumulation of 300 DD (estimated first egg hatch) on 25 Jun, while the rest of the treatments were applied at 360 DD (estimated mid-egg hatch) on 1 Jul. These sprays were then reapplied at 14-day intervals from the first application date (10 Jul and 24 Jul for the 300 DD plot and 16 Jul for the 360 DD plots).

The early application (300 DD) consisted of Intrepid 2F (12.0 oz/A) plus Latron B 1956 (16.0 oz/100), and the remainder of the treatments (360 DD) were: Deliver (8.0 oz/A), Dipel DF (1.5 lb./A), Spintor 2SC (5.0 oz/A) applied with LI-700 (16.0 oz/100), Danitol 2.4EC (10.7 oz/A) and an untreated check plot. Initial fruit damage from the summer generation of OBLR was estimated on 26 Jul by inspecting 300 fruits on trees from the center of each plot. Damage was assessed as present or absent, regardless of severity. Harvest evaluations were conducted on 28 Aug by randomly selecting 200 fruits from the center trees within each plot and inspecting them for damage. Fruit injury was classified on the USDA scale of Fancy, #1, or Cull. Data then was subjected to an analysis of variance, and means were separated using Fisher's Protected LSD Test (P<0.05). Data was transformed Arcsin (Sqrt X) prior to analysis.

Pressure from OBLR was relatively low in 2002 compared with past years, and fruit damage levels among the treatments and check plots were generally not statistically different. Fruit damage was considerably low in all of the treatments and the check plots at harvest and the relative effectiveness of treatments was different from that observed during the summer. Treatment rankings varied among the three levels of grading. However, the untreated check plots had the highest percentages of damage in all of the three grades. At harvest, Deliver, Spintor, and Intrepid were the only three treatments that had significanly less total fruit damage than that in the untreated check. Although various Bt products have been tested in NY against OBLR in previous years, Deliver is one of the few materials that has been more effective in preventing damage than the standard Bt product, Dipel, although the differences between these two products is not statistically significant. Danitol was less effective than any of the other treatments in protecting fruit, and damage in these plots at harvest was not significantly lower than that in the untreated checks. The relative ineffectiveness of this material may have been due to a buildup of resistance by OBLR populations within this region from previous usage of various synthetic pyrethroids.

 

Table 1. Comparison of insecticides against obliquebanded leafroller, 2002

 

 

 

 

% Damage at Harvest[f]

Treatment

Rate/A

Application
Timing

Summer
Damage[e]

Fancy

#1

Cull

Total

Deliver

8.0 oz

360 DD[a]

1.5ab

1.8a

1.3ab

1.5ab

4.5a

Dipel DF

1.5 lb.

360 DD[a]

0.7a

2.8ab
2.3ab

2.5ab

7.5ab

Spintor 2SC[c]

5.0 oz

360 DD[a]

1.7ab

2.0a

1.0a

2.8ab

5.8a

Intrepid 2F[d]

12.0 oz

300 DD[b]

2.3ab

2.8ab

1.5ab

0.8a

5.0a

Danitol 2.4EC

10.7 oz

360 DD[a]

3.3ab

2.8ab

2.3ab

4.3ab

9.3ab

Untreated Check

5.3b

5.0b

2.5b

6.3b

13.8b

 

Means within a column followed by the same letter are not significantly different (Fisher's Protected LSD Test, P 0.05). Data transformed arcsine (sqrt[x]) prior to analysis.

  1. Applications made on 1 Jul and 16 Jul
  2. Applications made on 25 Jun, 10 Jul and 24 Jul
  3. Applied with LI-700 16.0 oz/100 gal
  4. Applied with Latron B-1956 16.0 oz/100 gal
  5. Estimates taken on 26 Jul
  6. Harvest reading taken on 28 Aug

Return to top

 


 

 

Chem News

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Chem News

 

ISOMATE-LPTB LABELED

On Thursday, 5 June, the NYS DEC granted a registration for the use of Isomate-LPTB to control lesser peachtree borer and ("greater") peachtree borer in a wide range of stone fruits in NY. The standard rate for control of lesser peach tree borer is 100 ties per acre. If the ties are applied at a higher rate, both species of borer can be controlled by the application of the LPTB ties. Now would be the proper timing for application because we have just caught the first LPTB moth in Geneva today; PTB flight is expected in a few weeks. This product performed very well in NY field trials, and is a recommended alternative to pesticide sprays of trunks and scaffold branches.

 

Return to top


 

This material is based upon work supported by Smith Lever funds from the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.