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September 8, 2003 Volume 12 No. 26 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development

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Upcoming Pest Events

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Insects

 Current DD accumulations
43°F
50°F
(Geneva 1/1-9/8):

3066

2065

(Geneva 1/1-9/8/2002):

3361

2364

(Geneva "Normal"):

3210

2260

(Geneva 9/15 Predicted):

3225

2175

 

Upcoming Pest Events:

Ranges:

American plum borer 2nd flight subsides

2841-3698

1907-2640

Lesser appleworm 2nd flight peak

1801-3328

1188-2359

Lesser appleworm 2nd flight subsides

2775-3466

2002-2460

Lesser peachtree borer flight subsides

2782-3474

1796-2513

Obliquebanded leafroller 2nd flight subsides

2809-3656

1930-2573

Oriental fruit moth 3rd flight subsides

2987-3522

2018-2377

Redbanded leafroller 3rd flight peak

2514-3285

1818-2625

San Jose scale 2nd flight subsides

2494-3582

1662-2477

Sp. tentiform leafminer 3rd flight subsides

3235-3471

2228-2472

 

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Trap Catches

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Insects


TRAP CATCHES (Number/trap/day)

Geneva

       
 

8/21

8/25

9/2

9/8

Redbanded Leafroller

0.2

0.6

0.9

0.5

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

42.5

47.8

22.8

13.7

Oriental Fruit Moth

1.3

2.1

1.8

1.3

Lesser Appleworm

0.3

0.5

0.3

0.4

San Jose Scale

21.8

11.8

11.1

2.0

Codling Moth

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.3

0.0

0.3

0.1

American Plum Borer

0.3

0.3

0.0

0.0

Lesser Peachtree Borer

0.3

0.0

0.1

0.0

Peachtree Borer

0.0

0.1

0.0

0.0

Apple Maggot

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Highland (Dick Straub, Peter Jentsch):

 

7/28

8/4

8/11

8/25

Redbanded Leafroller

0.6

0.5

0.0

0.5

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

46.2

44.4

41.9

25.0

Oriental Fruit Moth

1.1

0.3

0.9

0.5

Lesser Appleworm

0.2

2.0

2.4

1.5

Codling Moth

0.4

0.9

0.6

0.1

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.4

0.6

1.0

0.2

Fruittree leafroller

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Sparganothis fruitworm

0.2

0.0

1.0

0.1

Tufted apple budmoth

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

Variegated leafroller

0.3

0.0

0.3

0.3

Dogwood borer

0.0

0.4

0.0

0.0

Apple maggot

1.0

0.7

0.8

0.2

 

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Insects

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Insects

 

2003 FRUIT ARTHROPOD PEST REVIEW

(Art Agnello & Dave Kain, Entomology, Geneva)

 

It's a little difficult to accept the notion that summer is on its way out; despite our going through a few stretches of hot and muggy weather, the psychological threshold that satisfies the establishment of there having actually been a summer (sort of like the opposite of a chilling requirement) was not solidly met in most people's minds this year. And that certain fall chill during the dawn and dusk hours assures us that we'd better forget about there being anything more than maybe a nice mild autumn to look forward to from now on.

Insects and mites also seemed to take the cue this season, and acted nearly like they had decided to give us a break for once (although we wouldn't want to appear reckless, it's probably late enough to risk the jinx of any last gasp blow-ups by saying this now). At any rate, insect and mite life cycles can't go on indefinitely, so this is probably a good time to cast a preliminary evaluation of the past season's arthropod features.

Regardless of how abnormally the rest of the growing season proceeded, we actually enjoyed one of the most gradual and normal-seeming spring periods experienced in NY in many years. It was a bit wet, of course, but the main problem is that this never transitioned into a good ol' summer pattern. But about that rain -- it did a world of good in acting to oppose many of the potential early season pests: European red mite, spotted tentiform leafminer, and rosy apple aphid, along with pear psylla and oriental fruit moth, were all denied favorable conditions for gaining that early season foothold that often preceeds a bad year, so most of these problems were neatly sidestepped this spring, and in some cases for the rest of the year. On the other hand, of course, we had one of our famously long plum curculio oviposition periods because of the cool temperatures, so growers who failed to keep the fruitlets diligently protected until about 2nd cover are seeing now why they needed to stay on the ball.

As it does most years, obliquebanded leafroller appeared pretty much on schedule, but generally responded well to treatment in orchards with reliably heavy populations. Larvae seemed to be about as evident in early July as in most typical seasons, but we're hoping that fruit damage will turn out to be down once the harvest is complete. The internal worm infestations of the last few years are puzzling by their scarcity, at least so far. Certainly, most growers who experienced problems were much more attentive to their mid- and late summer spray programs this year, but there's probably also a weather-related factor working in this "down" portion of the cycle, so we expect much fewer complaints in this area. (This is always the riskiest part of the year-end summary, since these pests really can flourish at the bitter end.)

Apple maggot seems to have been well represented in many of the old haunts where we've been trapping for it -- high numbers were not uncommon; however, we haven't yet seen evidence that the summer management programs weren't up to the task of dealing with them. One late season pest that we're still stretching to protect against is woolly apple aphid. Colonies have been troubling for much of the last half of the summer, and we don't really have many effective tactics to try against them.

Finally, the wait-and-see category contains a few of the usual members: Comstock mealybug, mirid bugs, stink bugs, and San Jose scale. These do a good job of staying concealed until loads start hitting the packinghouse door, so there may yet be a noteworthy postscript to this season -- later than normal, like just about everything else that happened this year.

 

 

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LET IT RAIN

(Dave Kain & Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva)

[Hotlink author names to dpk@cornell.edu and ama4@cornell.edu]

Proving once again that "normal" is anything but, this season started cool and wet and never varied much from that scenario. Degree-day accumulations put us about a week behind normal, and even further behind last year, throughout the season. Seemingly incessant rains made scab management particularly challenging and provided the pat answer to all the questions regarding unusual insect occurrences — It's the weather.

Following are comparative listings of some of the pest events that occurred this season (in Geneva) with calendar and degree-day normals. The values and dates are given +/- one standard deviation; i.e., events should occur within the stated range approximately 7 years out of 10.

 

DATE

DEGREE DAYS (BASE 43°F)

EVENT

Normal (+/-days)

2002

Normal (+/-DD)

2002

AMERICAN PLUM
BORER

       
         

1st catch

17-May(+/-7)

12-May

422(+/-104)

377

1st flight peak

2-Jun(+/-6)

16-Jun

705(+/-143)

891

1st flight subsiding

29-Jun(+/-7) 3-Jul 1360(+/-206) 1286

2nd flight start

11-Jul(+/-5)

21-Jul

1625(+/-239)

1784

2nd flight peak

28-Jul(+/-7)

18-Aug

2190(+/-234)

2579

         

APPLE MAGGOT

       
         

1st catch

29-Jun(+/-9)

14-Jul

1379(+/-202)

1600

Peak

4-Aug(+/-13)

28-Jul

2385(+/-208)

1970

Subsiding

3-Sep(+/-9)

21-Aug

3115(+/-282)

2663

         

CODLING MOTH

       
         

1st catch

19-May(+/-7)

22-May

487(+/-103)

484

1st flight peak

4-Jun(+/-11)

9-Jun

808(+/-199)

749

2nd flight start

18-Jul(+/-14)

14-Jul

1884(+/-327)

1600

         

GREEN FRUITWORM

       
         

1st catch

4-Apr(+/-8)

14-Apr

85(+/-38)

89

Peak

14-Apr(+/-11)

28-Apr

139(+/-52)

205

Subsiding

6-May(+/-10)

19-May

333(+/-112)

442

         

LESSER APPLEWORM

       
         

1st catch

10-May(+/-9)

12-May

378(+/-146)

377

1st flight peak

20-May(+/-8)

19-May

548(+/-166)

442

1st flight subsiding

19-Jun(+/-9) 26-Jun 1164(+/-220) 1126

2nd flight starts

10-Jul(+/-11)

14-Jul

1638(+/-329)

1600

2nd flight peak

31-Aug(+/-21)

14-Jul

3175(+/-292)

1600

         

LESSER PEACHTREE
BORER

       
         

1st catch

25-May(+/-8)

9-Jun

578(+/-145)

749

Flight subsiding

9-Sep(+/-6)

2-Sep

3193(+/-217)

2945

         

OBLIQUEBANDED LEAFROLLER

       
         

1st catch

10-Jun(+/-5)

19-Jun

916(+/-87)

955

1st flight peak

19-Jun(+/-9)

23-Jun

1134(+/-194)

1031

2nd flight begins

7-Aug(+/-9)

7-Aug

2486(+/-183)

2248

         

ORIENTAL FRUIT MOTH

       
         

1st catch

1-May(+/-8)

1-May

291(+/-94)

248

1st flight peak

13-May(+/-11)

12-May

419(+/-93)

377

2nd flight begins

1-Jul(+/-5)

30-Jun

1432(+/-145)

1204

2nd flight peak

9-Jul(+/-10)

7-Jul

1763(+/-371)

1422

3rd flight begins

11-Aug(+/-9)

21-Aug

2548(+/-219)

2663

3rd flight peak

26-Aug(+/-15)

25-Aug

2945(+/-317)

2766

         

PANDEMIS
LEAFROLLER

       
         

1st catch

4-Jun(+/-8)

19-Jun

806(+/-52)

955

Flight peak

11-Jun(+/-10)

19-Jun

966(+/-111)

955

Flight subsides

3-Jul(+/-6)

30-Jun

1511(+/-139)

1204

         

PEACHTREE BORER

       
         

1st catch

17-Jun(+/-11)

3-Jul

1055(+/-286)

1286

Flight subsides

24-Aug(+/-13)

2-Sep

2827(+/-302)

2945

         

REDBANDED
LEAFROLLER

       
         

1st catch

17-Apr(+/-8)

24-Apr

179(+/-82)

181

1st flight peak

4-May(+/-9)

12-May

303(+/-78)

377

2nd flight begins

1-Jul(+/-6)

3-Jul

1470(+/-211)

1286

2nd flight peak

14-Jul(+/-7)

21-Jul

1788(+/-271)

1784

2nd flight subsiding

5-Aug(+/-11) 14-Aug 2394(+/-257) 2462

3rd flight begins

20-Aug(+/-10)

25-Aug

2790(+/-169)

2766

3rd flight peak

27-Aug(+/-11)

2-Sep

2979(+/-242)

2945

         

SAN JOSE SCALE
- adult males

       
         

1st flight begins

17-May(+/-8)

29-May

481(+/-112)

574

1st flight peak

30-May(+/-8)

9-Jun

658(+/-73)

749

2nd flight begins

14-Jul(+/-10)

28-Jul

1685(+/-168)

1970

2nd flight peak

7-Aug(+/-9)

18-Aug

2326(+/-221)

2579

         

SPOTTED TENTIFORM LEAFMINER

       
         

1st catch

19-Apr(+/-7)

24-Apr

174(+/-64)

181

1st flight peak

7-May(+/-7)

5-May

336(+/-81)

280

2nd flight begins

14-Jun(+/-7)

23-Jun

1059(+/-120)

1031

2nd flight peak

7-Jul(+/-11)

7-Jul

1613(+/-244)

1422

3rd flight begins

7-Aug(+/-7)

7-Aug

2489(+/-170)

2248

3rd flight peak

22-Aug(+/-10)

14-Aug

2849(+/-222)

2462

         

CROP

DATE

DEGREE DAYS (BASE 43°F)

PHENOLOGY

Normal (+/-days)

2003

Normal (+/-DD)

2003

         

APPLE (MCINTOSH)

       

Green tip

12-Apr(+/-7)

15-Apr

120(+/-27)

103

Half-inch green

21-Apr(+/-7)

21-Apr

173(+/-25)

166

Tight cluster

29-Apr(+/-6)

28-Apr

232(+/-19)

205

Pink

5-May(+/-6)

5-May

292(+/-19)

280

Bloom

11-May(+/-7)

12-May

383(+/-37)

377

Petal fall

18-May(+/-6)

22-May

485(+/-44)

484

         

APPLE
(RED DELICIOUS)

       

Green tip

10-Apr(+/-8)

17-Apr

146(+/-38)

132

Half-inch green

18-Apr(+/-9)

28-Apr

177(+/-31)

205

Tight cluster

26-Apr(+/-6)

1-May

248(+/-27)

248

Pink

8-May(+/-7)

12-May

339(+/-47)

377

Bloom

15-May(+/-8)

22-May

434(+/-66)

484

Petal fall

23-May(+/-9)

31-May

559(+/-89)

610

         

PEAR (BARTLETT)

       

Bud burst

22-Apr(+/-7)

17-Apr

167(+/-45)

132

Green cluster

30-Apr(+/-6)

28-Apr

238(+/-27)

205

White bud

5-May(+/-7)

5-May

298(+/-43)

280

Bloom

8-May(+/-7)

12-May

350(+/-50)

377

Petal fall

15-May(+/-8)

19-May

442(+/-55)

442

         

SWEET CHERRY

       

Bud burst

21-Apr(+/-8)

24-Apr

169(+/-26)

181

White bud

29-Apr(+/-7)

28-Apr

218(+/-26)

205

Bloom

4-May(+/-6)

5-May

266(+/-30)

280

Petal fall

12-May(+/-5)

12-May

387(+/-47)

377

Fruit set

16-May(+/-5)

19-May

450(+/-43)

442

         

TART CHERRY
(MONTMORENCY)

       

Bud burst

26-Apr(+/-7)

28-Apr

208(+/-39)

205

White bud

5-May(+/-7)

1-May

268(+/-29)

248

Bloom

10-May(+/-6)

9-May

351(+/-50)

328

Petal fall

17-May(+/-6)

19-May

458(+/-54)

442

Fruit set

23-May(+/-8)

22-May

545(+/-61)

484

 

 

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This material is based upon work supported by Smith Lever funds from the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Return to top