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August 2, 2004 Volume 13 No. 20 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development

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Coming Events

Coming Pest Events | Pest Focus | Trap Catches | Insects  | General Info

Current DD accumulations
43°F
50°F

(Geneva 1/1-8/2):

2241

1450

(Geneva 1/1-8/2/2003):

2101

1359

(Geneva "Normal"):

2247

1547

(Geneva 8/9 Predicted):

2414

1574

(Highland 1/1-8/2):

2702

1873

 

Coming Events:

Ranges:

 

American plum borer 2nd flight peak

1946-2412

1301-1679

Apple maggot flight peak

2139-2587

1458-1770

Codling moth 2nd flight begins

1573-2299

1018-1540

Comstock mealybug 2nd gen. crawlers emerging

2234-2624

1505-1781

Oriental fruit moth 2nd flight subsides

2067-2533

1379-1771

San Jose scale 2nd flight peak

2136-2560

1459-1805

STLM 2nd flight subsides

2006-2402

1326-1680

STLM 3rd flight begins

2288-2644

1532-1872

 

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Trap Catches

Coming Pest Events | Pest Focus | Trap Catches | Insects | General Info

TRAP CATCHES (Number/trap/day)
Geneva

7/22

7/26

7/29

8/2

Redbanded Leafroller

0.3

1.3

0.3

0.9

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

28.3

22.0

7.8

21.1

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.0

0.1

0.5

0.8

Lesser Appleworm

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

Codling Moth

0.0

0.0

0.2

0.3

San Jose Scale

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1*

American Plum Borer

0.5

1.3*

1.3

1.0

Lesser Peachtree Borer

2.7

1.0

0.3

0.6

Peachtree Borer

0.0

0.0

0.3

3.0

Apple Maggot

0.7

0.2

0.2

0.1

Dogwood Borer

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.3

Highland (Dick Straub, Peter Jentsch):

7/12

7/19

7/26

8/2

Redbanded Leafroller

0.0

0.6

0.6

0.1

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

58.5

23.9

47.9

29.6

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.7

0.3

0.3

0.4

Codling Moth

0.1

0.1

2.3

0.4

Lesser Appleworm

0.4

0.8

3.9

2.0

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

Sparganothis Fruitworm

0.3

0.4

0.1

0.2

Tufted Apple Bud Moth

0.0

0.1

0.0

0.0

Variegated Leafroller

0.1

0.0

0.1

0.2

Apple Maggot

0.9

0.1

0.1

0.3

* = 1st catch

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Pest Focus

Coming Pest Events | Pest Focus | Trap Catches | Insects | General Info

Geneva: Obliquebanded Leafroller 2nd flight beginning.
Spotted Tentiform Leafminer 2nd flight began 6/17. The second
sample of sap-feeding mines, if necessary, should be taken at
840-1150 DD (base 43°F) following this event. DD43 since then =
1138.

 

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Insects

Coming Pest Events | Pest Focus | Trap Catches | Insects | General Info


ORCHARD RADAR DIGEST

Geneva Predictions:
Roundheaded Appletree Borer
Peak hatch roughly: July 15 to August 4.

Dogwood Borer
Peak egg hatch: August 7.

Codling Moth
Codling moth development as of August 2: 2nd generation adult emergence at 23% and 2nd generation egg hatch at 3%.
2nd generation 7% CM egg hatch: August 7 (= target date for first spray where multiple sprays needed to control 2nd generation CM).

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer
Third optimized sample date for 2nd generation STLM sapfeeding mines, if needed: August 3.

White Apple Leafhopper
2nd generation WAL found on apple foliage: August 14.

 

Highland Predictions:
Codling Moth
Codling moth development as of August 2: 2nd generation adult emergence at 69% and 2nd generation egg hatch at 30%.
2nd generation 30% CM egg hatch: August 2 (= single spray date where one spray needed to control 2nd generation codling moth).

White Apple Leafhopper
2nd generation WAL found on apple foliage: August 1.

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MODEL BUILDING

   Oriental Fruit Moth. This pest's development is tracked using a 45°F DD model from biofix, defined as the first sustained moth catch of the first brood.  We are currently into the second brood, which started about June 30 in WNY.  Pesticides to control this brood should be applied starting at 1450-1500 DD after biofix, and followed up on a 10-14-day interval if trap numbers exceed 10 moths/trap/week.  Our sample numbers as of today:

Geneva (biofix 5/7) - 1740
Albion (biofix 5/4) - 1676
Appleton (biofix 4/30) - 1701
Williamson (biofix 5/3) - 1749

   Codling Moth. We are currently between the first and second brood control window for this pest, and considerably further along in the Hudson Valley.  With 1260 DD (base 50°F) from the 1st catch of the season as a first spray date for the second brood, we currently have:

Geneva (biofix May 17) - 1168
Albion (biofix May 17) - 1121
Williamson (biofix May 18) - 1096
Highland (biofix May 10) - 1592

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HANGING AROUND THE DOCK

(Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva)

   Before and during apple harvest in recent years, a number of growers and fieldmen have been unpleasantly surprised by the appearance of neat little (2 mm) holes bored into the side of their fruit, similar in appearance to those caused by a stem puncture.  Although graders sometimes attribute this damage to apple maggot or European corn borer, cutting open these apples reveals a bright green worm with a light brown head, not feeding but lying inactive, in the burrow extending in from each hole.  These are larvae of the dock sawfly, Ametastegia glabrata, a highly sporadic but nonetheless well documented apple pest that has been known to show up in our area since 1908.

   Dock sawfly probably confines its feeding almost entirely to plants belonging to the buckwheat family (Polygonaceae), including numerous docks and sorrels, the knotweeds and bindweeds, or else wild buckwheat or alfalfa.  In feeding on any of these plants, the larvae devour the leaf tissue and the smaller veins, eating out irregular holes in the leaves.  Ordinarily, the midribs and the larger veins are untouched.  This insect should not be confused with the related European apple sawfly, Hoplocampa testudinea, which has a whitish larva that lives and feeds in young apples, particularly prevalent in the eastern apple regions of N.Y.

   Injury to apples by the dock sawfly is known to occur only in the late summer and early fall, when the fruit is approaching maturity and the sawfly is searching for an overwintering site.  The greater hardness of immature apples probably deters the larvae from burrowing into these, so although 4 generations per year have been identified, only the last one or two are of concern to apple growers.  The injury to apples consists externally of the small round holes bored by the larvae, which after a few days show a slightly sunken, brownish ring around them and occasionally may be surrounded by a larger discolored halo.  These holes may occur anywhere on the surface, but are most numerous around the calyx and stem ends, or at a point where the apple touches a leaf or another apple, since it is easier for the larva to obtain a foothold here.  Inside, the injury is usually more serious, since the larva often burrows to the core and usually hollows out a pupal cell somewhat larger than itself.  Apples may have three or four, or sometimes even eight, holes in them of varying depths, but contain only one or two worms.

   Since the dock sawfly does not feed upon any part of the apple tree, but must live on the above-mentioned succulent weeds, it becomes an apple pest only where these plants are growing in or around the orchard.  There is little danger from this insect in orchards where the food plants don't exist.  Likewise, the possibility of the larvae coming into the orchard from neighboring meadows, ditch banks, or roadsides is slight, for the larvae are incapable of finding their way over any extent of bare soil.  The adults, though active, are not strong fliers, and it is not possible for the insect to travel far in this stage.  Now would be a good time to assess the weed situation in your orchard and make plans for such selective herbicide applications as may be appropriate regarding this insect.  Even though common wisdom says this sawfly is a pest only every 10-12 years, this is only an average estimation, and it's not a bad idea to anticipate the unexpected when hardly any season is considered to be "average".

(Information adapted from Newcomer, E. J. 1916. The dock false-worm: An apple pest.  USDA Bull. 265, 40 pp.)

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General Info

Coming Pest Events | Pest Focus | Trap Catches | Insects |General Info

AND THE FIELD TOURS JUST KEEP COMING

      We're a month away from the annual N.Y. Fruit Pest Control Field Day, which will take place during Labor Day week on Sept. 9 and 10, as dictated by tradition.  This year, as we did last year in order to accommodate participants who may wish to attend other area tours earlier in the week, the dates have been shifted to the Thursday and Friday of the week, AND the Geneva installment will again take place first (Thursday Sept. 9), with the Hudson Valley installment on the second day (Friday Sept. 10).  Activities will commence in Geneva on the 9th, with registration, coffee, etc., in the lobby of Barton Lab at 8:30 am.  The tour will proceed to the orchards to view plots and preliminary data from field trials involving new fungicides, miticides, and insecticides on tree fruits and grapes.  It is anticipated that the tour of field plots will be completed by noon.  On the 10th, participants will register at the Hudson Valley Laboratory starting at 8:30, after which we will view and discuss results from field trials on apples.

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This material is based upon work supported by Smith Lever funds from the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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