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August 9, 2004 Volume 13 No. 21 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development

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Coming Events

Coming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Insects  

Current DD accumulations
43°F
50°F

(Geneva 1/1-8/9):

2398

1558

(Geneva 1/1-8/9/2003):

2310

1519

(Geneva "Normal"):

2441

1693

(Geneva 8/16 Predicted):

2578

1689

(Highland 1/1-8/9):

2890

2012

 

Coming Events:

Ranges:

 

Apple maggot flight peak

2139-2587

1458-1770

Codling moth 2nd flight peak

2005-2835

1337-1977

Comstock mealybug 2nd gen. crawlers peak

2380-2624

1505-1781

Oriental fruit moth 3rd flight begins

2342-2756

1613-1901

San Jose scale 2nd flight peak

2136-2560

1459-1805

STLM 3rd flight begins

2288-2644

1532-1872

 

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Trap Catches

Coming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Insects  

TRAP CATCHES (Number/trap/day)
Geneva

7/29

8/2

8/5

8/9

Redbanded Leafroller

0.3

0.9

0.3

0.4

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

7.8

21.1

11.8

7.5

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.5

0.8

0.0

0.4

Lesser Appleworm

0.0

0.0

0.2

0.0

Codling Moth

0.2

0.3

0.0

0.0

San Jose Scale

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.0

0.1*

0.0

0.4

American Plum Borer

1.3

1.0

2.7

1.8

Lesser Peachtree Borer

0.3

0.6

3.3

0.1

Peachtree Borer

0.3

3.0

3.7

1.3

Apple Maggot

0.2

0.1

0.7

0.3

Dogwood Borer

0.0

0.3

0.0

0.0

Highland (Dick Straub, Peter Jentsch):

7/19

7/26

8/2

8/9

Redbanded Leafroller

0.6

0.6

0.1

0.2

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

23.9

47.9

29.6

16.6

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.3

0.3

0.4

0.2

Codling Moth

0.1

2.3

0.4

0.2

Lesser Appleworm

0.8

3.9

2.0

1.2

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Sparganothis Fruitworm

0.4

0.1

0.2

0.2

Tufted Apple Bud Moth

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

Variegated Leafroller

0.0

0.1

0.2

0.2

Apple Maggot

0.1

0.1

0.3

0.3

* = 1st catch

 

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Insects

Coming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Insects  


ORCHARD RADAR DIGEST

Geneva Predictions:
Dogwood Borer
Peak egg hatch: August 7.

Codling Moth
Codling moth development as of August 9: 2nd generation adult emergence at 39% and 2nd generation egg hatch at 8%.
2nd generation 7% CM egg hatch: August 8 (= target date for first spray where multiple sprays needed to control 2nd generation CM). 2nd generation 30% CM egg hatch: August 20 (= single spray date where one spray needed to control 2nd generation codling moth).

White Apple Leafhopper
2nd generation WAL found on apple foliage: August 14.

 

Highland Predictions:
Codling Moth
Codling moth development as of August 9: 2nd generation adult emergence at 85% and 2nd generation egg hatch at 53%.

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MODEL BUILDING

Oriental Fruit Moth. This pest's development is tracked using a 45°F DD model from biofix, defined as the first sustained moth catch of the first brood.  We are currently in the control window for the second brood, which started about June 30 in WNY.  Pesticides to control this brood should have been applied starting at 1450-1500 DD after biofix, and followed up on a 10-14-day interval if trap numbers exceeded 10 moths/trap/week.  Many blocks with a history of OFM pressure would be due for a follow-up application this week.  Our sample numbers as of today:

Geneva (biofix 5/7) - 1882
Albion (biofix 5/4) - 1822
Appleton (biofix 4/30) - 1860
Williamson (biofix 5/3) - 1892

Codling Moth. We are currently approaching the second brood control window for this pest, and considerably further along in the Hudson Valley.  With 1260 DD (base 50°F) from the 1st catch of the season as a first spray date for the second brood, we currently have:

Geneva (biofix May 17) - 1275
Albion (biofix May 17) - 1232
Williamson (biofix May 18) - 1204

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(WET) DOG DAYS

(Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva)

   Most of the season's pest control decisions will probably be completed this week, and as growers prepare to make what will likely be their final run through the orchard for crop protection purposes before turning their attention to harvest activities, we are once again looking back at a season where many traditional insect pests have either failed to be a big concern, or else were just as obstructed by unfavorable weather as everything else was, and conventional wisdom is probably out someplace looking for a familiar face.  At any rate, for want of any good arguments to the contrary, here's a quick rundown of some of the more important players to keep in mind for these dog day duties.

Apple Maggot
Catches of adults have been curiously variable around the state -- quite low but steady in WNY, and often very high in the Hudson Valley, so this reinforces the value of block-specific monitoring for spray decisions.  Mid-August is traditionally still fair game for a decent number of flies to be out and laying eggs, although numbers would normally begin tapering off soon.  This is yet another of those seasons when localized trapping can pay off in the event that some blocks are under greater pressure than others, even on the same farm, so please continue to monitor traps in representative blocks. 

Internal Lepidoptera
This group has become our perennial wild-card puzzler since making such a big splash in 2002.  Last year, which was notably similar to this season, the later broods of oriental fruit moth and/or codling moth failed to make much of a showing, which was a welcome situation.  Not content to assume the best scenario, however we have attempted to keep close tabs on adult catches and larval infestations once again this summer, but things are still fairly quiet as best as we can tell.  Trap counts for the 2nd flight of oriental fruit moth have tapered off from their moderate July levels, and we have yet to see whether the 3rd brood will make its presence felt in the western orchards (both apple and peach).  In our eastern demonstration blocks (Champlain Valley, Capital District, and Hudson Valley), the same scenario applies with regard to lesser appleworm, which is the primary pest.  Pheromone disruption results have been encouraging so far, but the edges of disrupted blocks are always susceptible to some problematic fruit infestations.  For now, we're recommending that problem sites be kept covered with at least another spray, and we'll see what the tail end of the pre-harvest period looks like.  Options include Guthion or Imidan or Asana in peaches.  In apples and pears, you can use Guthion, Imidan, Assail, Avaunt, Warrior or Danitol; the non-OP materials will additionally give control of white apple leafhopper.  For control of OFM, alternate row middle applications will not be as effective as whole orchard sprays in high pressure blocks.  Assess the pressure in your specific situations, check the pre-harvest intervals, and determine whether a full or border spray might be in order.

European Corn Borer
Recall that these moths have a final flight that extends to the middle of September, and that the offspring can inflict last-minute fruit feeding damage to later varieties.  One or two late sprays of a B.t. product like Dipel can go a long ways toward minimizing this injury, and the 0-day PHI is compatible with any harvest schedule.  Also, SpinTor applied against late season leafrollers will provide incidental corn borer control (PHI = 7 days).

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This material is based upon work supported by Smith Lever funds from the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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