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September 6, 2005 Volume 14 No. 25 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development

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Upcoming Events

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Insects | General Info

Current DD accumulations
43°F
50°F

(Geneva 1/1-9/6):

3387

2397

(Geneva 1/1-9/6/2004):

3089

2054

(Geneva "Normal"):

3137

2180

(Geneva 9/12 Predicted):

3518

2487

 

Coming Events:

Ranges:

 

Lesser appleworm 2nd flight subsides 2883–3467 1973–2387
Redbanded leafroller 3rd flight subsides 3124–3436 2142–2422
Codling moth 2nd flight subsides 2859–3583 1944–2536
Lesser peachtree borer flight subsides 2984–3422 2005–2413
Obliquebanded leafroller 2nd flight subsides 2947–3467 2022–2438
Oriental fruit moth 3rd flight subsides 2962–3381 2000–2288
American plum borer 2nd flight subsides 3128–3612 2179–2541
Spotted tentiform leafminer 3rd flight subsides 3230–3444 2246–2432

 

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Trap Catches

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Insects

TRAP CATCHES (Number/trap/day)
Geneva

8/22

8/25

8/29

9/6

Redbanded Leafroller

1.4

1.0

0.4

0.9

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

20.6

28.0

10.6

5.6

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Lesser Appleworm

0.0

0.0

0.3

0.1

San Jose Scale

5.6

0.7

2.6

3.4

American Plum Borer

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.1

Lesser Peachtree Borer

0.9

0.5

0.1

0.1

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.1

0.3

0.0

0.1

Apple maggot

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.0

Highland (Dick Straub, Peter Jentsch):

8/1

8/8

8/17

8/22

Redbanded Leafroller

0.2

0.7

4.6

5.0

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

43.1

50.7

75.9

38.2

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.9

1.2

1.7

2.2

Lesser Appleworm

0.9

0.9

3.8

2.7

Codling Moth

1.1

0.4

0.6

0.5

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.5

0.5

<0.1

<0.1

Apple maggot

0.1

0.1

0.2

<0.1

* = 1st catch

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Insects

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Insects

INSECT SUMMERY

2005 FRUIT ARTHROPOD PEST REVIEW
(Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva)

   For once, we find ourselves approaching the end of a growing season that was more like 'the ones we used to have' than any in the past several years, and although keeping the trees covered and the pests under control was considerably less complicated than during the shower-heavy 2003 and 2004 seasons, the hot and dry conditions presented their own kinds of challenges in terms of arthropod management.  Nevertheless, the pre-autumnal environmental cues already have been exerting their effects on the insect community, so this is probably a good time to attempt our annual re-cap of the season's arthropod features.

   We may find it a little difficult to recall from this vantage point, but we actually started out with a relatively slow, cool and rainy spring, which had us "behind normal" until well into June, when a brief period of warmer temperatures came in during the fruit set period.  Similar to last year, this had the positive effect of not only obstructing the early season pests such as European red mite, spotted tentiform leafminer, and rosy apple aphid, along with pear psylla, but it also gave plum curculio enough steam to progress through its oviposition period in fairly short order, so that most locations could get by with just the petal fall and 1st cover applications to obtain sufficient protection.

   Living up to its reputation as a master of elusiveness, obliquebanded leafroller appeared to be very scarce during its overwintered and early 1st summer broods, as a number of orchard inspections around the state turned up extremely low numbers.  Nevertheless, early pre-harvest inspections are revealing that quite a few orchards concealed marginally damaging populations that caused the typical "late OBLR" damage we're so accustomed to seeing in NY.  The internal worm (oriental fruit moth, codling moth, etc.) populations once again were on the upswing in the state this year, with notably high moth catches and some definite fruit damage showing up in the traditional high-pressure spots.  Particularly troubling is the fact that codling moth seems to be getting more common than it has previously been.  We may be seeing the end of our CM "escape" phase, which distinguished us from our neighbors in Michigan and Pennsylvania; this will mean that more alternative CM control measures (such as mating disruption and use of newer chemistry and CM virus) may need to be considered in NYS during the next years.

   Apple maggot activity was also back to its more typical strength this year -- some high populations evident in eastern NY, particularly in the Hudson Valley, and quite a few western NY locations -- on the whole, about what we would expect given the favorable climatic conditions.  European red mite did manage to cause its share of problems eventually, although for some reason not as severely as we expected, and twospotted spider mite, which loves this kind of summer weather, also seemed to be fairly limited.  Woolly apple aphid was evident early once again, but I don't know how widespread the late season problems will be; this is of particular interest, since we are still lacking any very effective tactics to use against it.  Other sometimes sporadic summer pests were also troublesome, depending on the specific locality: pear psylla and potato leafhopper, stink bugs, and San Jose scale all generated their share of attention in one area of the state or another.

   Finally, a few pests were apparently around in some numbers, but we're not yet sure of the magnitude at this point: Comstock mealybug, white apple leafhopper and tarnished plant bug.  As always, some of these won't be known entirely until after the fruit starts to hit the packinghouse door.

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HAZY 'N' CRAZY

TOPICS OF DISCUSSION
(Dave Kain & Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva)

   In the middle of an otherwise normal spring, winter decided to return for a day just about the time that McIntosh bloom rolled around, resulting in scattered frost damage and a fairly lengthy bloom. Not to be outdone, summer did an about-face from spring, and from last season, and was one of the hottest we’ve seen. At this writing we're approximately 10 days ahead of last season and a week ahead of “normal”, in terms of degree day accumulation. 

   Following are comparative listings of some of the pest events that occurred this season (in Geneva) with calendar and degree-day normals.  The values and dates are given +/- one standard deviation; i.e., events should occur within the stated range approximately 7 years out of 10.


This material is based upon work supported by Smith Lever funds from the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Return to top