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May 22, 2006 Volume 15 No. 10 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development

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Upcoming Events

Upcoming Pest Events | Phenologies | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Diseases | General Info

Current DD accumulations
43°F
50°F

(Geneva 1/1-5/22):

547

257

(Geneva 1/1-5/22/2005):

437

219

(Geneva "Normal"):

535

296

(Geneva 1/1-5/29 Predicted):

660

327

(Highland 3/1-5/22/06):

585

300

 

Coming Events:

Ranges:

 

American plum borer peak catch

569-837

279-495

European red mite 1st summer eggs present

447-555

237-309

Lesser appleworm 1st flight peak

384-696

189-387

Mirid bugs 90% hatch

467-615

240-322

Mirid bugs hatch complete

489-639

252-350

Obliquebanded leafroller pupae present

601-821

328-482

Pear psylla hardshells present

493-643

271-361

San Jose scale 1st catch

377-597

186-324

Spotted tentiform leafminer sap-feeders present

343-601

165-317

 


Phenologies

Upcoming Pest Events | Phenologies | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Diseases | General Info

(Geneva):

5/22

Apple (McIntosh):

Fruit set

Apple (Red Delicious):  

Petal fall

Apple (Empire):

Petal fall

Peach:

Fruit set, shucks on

Plum:

Fruit set, shucks off

Tart cherry:

Fruit set, shucks off

 

 

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Trap Catches

Upcoming Pest Events | Phenologies | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Diseases | General Info

Geneva

5/11

5/15

5/18

5/22

Redbanded Leafroller

3.5

1.6

2.3

0.3

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer    

32.5

9.9

3.3

0.5

Lesser Appleworm

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.3

0.1

0.2

0.0

Codling Moth

-

0.0

0.0

0.0

San Jose Scale

-

0.0

0.0

0.0

American Plum Borer

0.7*

0.6

0.2

0.0

Lesser Peachtree Borer

-

0.4*

0.0

0.0

 

Highland (Peter Jentsch)

5/1

5/8

5/15

5/22

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

84.1

36.3

6.4

1.1

Oriental Fruit Moth

6.5*

5.3

3.4

0.9

Codling Moth

0.1*

0.0

0.2

0.2

Obliquebanded Leafroller

-

0.0

0.0

0.0

Fruittree Leafroller

-

0.0

0.0

0.1

Tufted Apple Budmoth

-

0.0

0.1*

0.1

Variegated Leafroller

-

0.0

0.0

0.0

Lesser Peachtree Borer

-

0.0

0.1*

0.1

Dogwood Borer

-

0.0

0.0

0.1*

Lesser Appleworm

-

0.0

0.4*

0.0

* = 1st catch

 

 

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Pest Focus

Upcoming Pest Events | Phenologies | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Diseases | General Info

Highland: Plum Curculio, Tarnished Plant Bug, European Apple Sawfly, and
caterpillar damage observed on apple.
Low levels of Leafhopper damage observed.
1st Dogwood Borer trap catch 5/22.
Codling Moth sustained flight under way.
Pear Psylla 2nd generation adults, egg numbers increasing.

 

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Insects

Upcoming Pest Events | Phenologies | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Diseases | General Info

FLIGHT PLAN

ORCHARD RADAR DIGEST

 

Geneva Predictions:
Roundheaded Appletree Borer
RAB adult emergence begins: May 31; Peak emergence: June 14.
RAB egglaying begins: June 9. Peak egglaying period roughly: June 29 to July 16.

Codling Moth
Codling moth development as of May 22: 1st generation adult emergence at 1% and 1st generation egg hatch at 0%.
1st generation 3% CM egg hatch: June 11 (= target date for first spray where multiple sprays needed to control 1st generation CM).
1st generation 20% CM egg hatch: June 20 (= target date where one spray needed to control 1st generation codling moth).

Lesser Appleworm
1st LAW flight, peak trap catch: May 25.

Mullein Plant Bug
The most accurate time for limb tapping counts, but possibly after MPB damage has occurred, is when 90% of eggs have hatched.
90% egg hatch date: May 25.

Obliquebanded Leafroller
1st generation OBLR flight, first trap catch expected: June 12.

Oriental Fruit Moth
Optimum 1st generation second treatment date, if needed: May 30.

San Jose Scale
First adult SJS caught on trap: May 18.

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer
1st generation sapfeeding mines start showing: May 22.
Optimum sample date is around May 25, when a larger portion of the mines have become detectable.

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Diseases

Upcoming Pest Events | Phenologies | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Diseases | General Info

 

LET'S TEST SCAB

APPLE SCAB AND FUNGICIDE RESISTANCE
( Wolfram Koeller and Diana Parker,
Plant Pathology, Geneva )

   What started out as an "easy" scab season in our Station orchards here in Geneva turned around to be a serious problem.  Following a heavy 3-day infection period at tight cluster, 90% of clusters had scab lesions at petal fall, and the performance of fungicides in our orchard trials confirmed previous experiences.

   Starting the scab program at half-inch green rather than at green tip and responding to the infection at tight cluster with a post-infection spray provided no or poor control of cluster leaf scab.  Dithane at its low mixture rate, but also when mixed with Captan, failed to control cluster leaf scab.  As expected for an orchard with resistance to the SI fungicides, Nova, even in combination with Dithane, performed poorly. 

   The performance of the strobilurin Flint was also poor, showing one more time that the strobilurins Flint and Sovran are starting to lose their post-infection edge.  Both Scala and Vangard provided adequate post-infection activity, but we will have to wait until harvest to find out whether and how this post-infection advantage can be carried over to good control of fruit scab at harvest.

   We have continued our sensitivity testing of the apple scab fungus during the 2005 season, and the not so "pretty" picture we found a year earlier has been confirmed.  Resistance to the SIs Nova, Procure and Rubigan is by now quite common rather than a rare occasion here and there.  Resistance to Syllit is unpredictable.  We found that, once an orchard had developed resistance to dodine, this resistance was stable for more than 30 years, even after orchards had been replanted.  We have not yet discovered an orchard totally immune to the strobilurins Flint and Sovran.  But, sensitivity shifts toward resistance are obvious.  These sensitivity shifts have eroded the post-infection power of the strobilurins.  They remain very effective in a protective mode. 

   The APs Scala and Vangard remain a "hard nut to crack".  We found that in SI-resistant orchards their potency was diminished before they ever were used.  We also found that their post-infection advantage in the early scab season provided little advantage in the control of fruit scab at harvest.

   Where do we go from here?  With financial aid provided by the Northeast IPM Center, we will be able to test the resistance level of scab lesions found on leaves of commercial orchards "for free".  How many orchards can we test?  About 25, on a "first come, first served" basis.  We also will not accept samples after 15 July.

   How to submit leaves with scab lesions to be tested?  Easy.  Contact Diana Parker, Cornell University, Department of Plant Pathology, 630 West North Street, Barton Laboratory, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456.  (Telephone 315-787-2400; dmp2@nysaes.cornell.edu).  The procedure for collecting and shipping the leaves can be found on our Geneva web site (http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/pp/extension/tfabp/index.html) or from your regional Cornell Cooperative Extension agents.  Each shipment of leaves must be accompanied by the name, the address and the telephone/e-mail number of the submitter, and a summary of the orchard's fungicide history.  Please contact Diana Parker prior to a shipment (Telephone 315-787-2400; dmp2@cornell.edu).

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General Info

Upcoming Pest Events | Phenologies | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects | Diseases | General Info

 

SKINNY ON THINNING

UPDATED HORTICULTURAL INFORMATION IN THE RECOMMENDS
( Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva )

 

   I'd like to note once again that we did not receive all of the revisions to the "2006 Pest Management Guidelines for Commercial Tree-Fruit Production" in time to include them in the printed version of the "Recommends".  These revisions (which pertain to the thinning and growth regulator recommendations) are correct in the online versions, and can be printed out easily enough by going to the website pdf version and printing off the following pages:

Pages 144-154 and p. 160:

Page 172

Page 197

Page 203

Page 210

and page 235


This material is based upon work supported by Smith Lever funds from the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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