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July 17, 2006 Volume 15 No. 18 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development

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Upcoming Events

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects

Current DD accumulations
43°F
50°F

(Geneva 1/1-7/17):

1926

1256

(Geneva 1/1-7/17/2005):

1917

1284

(Geneva "Normal"):

1833

1184

(Geneva 1/1-7/24 Predicted):

2151

1432

(Highland 3/1-7/17/06):

1945

1278

 

Coming Events:

Ranges:

 

American plum borer 2nd flight begins

1411-1893

1020-1232

Apple maggot first oviposition punctures

1528-2078

1021-1495

Codling moth 2nd flight begins

1555-2283

999-1529

Lesser appleworm 2nd flight begins

1365-1979

889-1305

Obliquebanded leafroller 1st flight subsides

1618-2130

1038-1434

Oriental fruit moth 2nd flight peak

1378-2086

865-1415

Redbanded leafroller 2nd flight peak

1524-2018

965-1353

San Jose scale 2nd flight peak

2103-2543

1432-1790

STLM 2nd generation tissue feeders present

1378-2035

913-1182

Spottend tentiform leafminer 2nd flight subsides

2013-2393

1328-1672

 


Trap Catches

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects

Geneva

7/6

7/10

7/13

7/17

Redbanded Leafroller

0.0

0.3*

0.0

1.9

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

97.7

76.3

35.8

26.3

Lesser Appleworm

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.0

0.1*

0.0

0.0

Codling Moth

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

San Jose Scale

0.0

0.1

0.7*

283

American Plum Borer

0.0

0.1

0.2

0.0

Lesser Peachtree Borer

0.7

0.6

0.0

0.1

Dogwood Borer

-

1.9

-

1.9

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.0

0.1

0.0

0.0

Peachtree Borer

0.2

0.8

0.2

0.3

Apple Maggot

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Highland (Peter Jentsch)

6/19

6/26

7/10

7/17

Redbanded Leafroller

-

-

-

3.2

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

84.9

86.1

-

0.0

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.1

1.2

1.4

0.3

Codling Moth

2.5

2.1

0.4

0.4

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.5

0.5

0.1

0.0

Fruittree Leafroller

0.1

0.2

0.0

0.0

Tufted Apple Budmoth

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Variegated Leafroller

0.0

0.4

0.1

0.0

Lesser Peachtree Borer

2.4

1.1

0.5

0.3

Dogwood Borer

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.3

Lesser Appleworm

1.7

2.2

0.4

0.6

Apple Maggot

0.1*

0.0

0.1

0.1

* = 1st catch

 

 

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Pest Focus

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects

GENEVA: San Jose Scale 2nd flight increasing.

HIGHLAND: First Stink Bug feeding observed on apple
Apple Maggot numbers at action threshold; no oviposition observed yet.
Obliquebanded Leafroller summer brood larvae feeding in terminals.
Fruit feeding is low at this time.

 

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Insects

Upcoming Pest Events | Trap Catches | Pest Focus | Insects

THE FLY WAY

ORCHARD RADAR DIGEST

Geneva Predictions:
Roundheaded Appletree Borer
Peak hatch roughly: July 12 to July 30.

Dogwood Borer
Peak Dogwood borer egg hatch roughly: August 1.

Codling Moth
Codling moth development as of July 17: 2nd generation adult emergence at 11% and 2nd generation egg hatch at 1%.
2nd generation 7% CM egg hatch: July 25 (= target date for first spray where multiple sprays needed to control 2nd generation CM).
2nd generation 30% CM egg hatch: Aug 3 (= target date where one spray needed to control 2nd generation CM).

Oriental Fruit Moth
2nd generation second treatment date, if needed: July 17.

Redbanded Leafroller
Peak catch and approximate start of egg hatch: July 13.

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer
Optimum first sample date for 2nd generation STLM sap-feeding mines: July 13.

 

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MODEL BUILDING

Insect model degree day accumulations:

DD43 since 1st Obliquebanded Leafroller catch (90% hatch @ 810, 100% hatch @ 950):
GENEVA: 870
HIGHLAND: 1057
DD45 since 1st Oriental Fruit Moth 2nd generation catch, July 5 (approximate start of egg hatch @ 175-200):
APPLETON: 304
ALBION: 313
SODUS: 281
WILLIAMSON: 302
DD50 since 1st Codling Moth 1st generation catch (2nd brood management sprays recommended @ 1260-1370):
APPLETON: 968
ALBION: 986
SODUS: 689
WILLIAMSON: 913
HIGHLAND: 1011


DEGREE DAYS

Consult our mini expert system for arthropod pest management, the
Apple Pest Degree Day Calculator
http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ipm/specware/newa/appledd.php

Find accumulated degree days between dates with the
Degree Day Calculator
http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ipm/specware/newa/

Powered by the NYS IPM Program’s NEWA weather data and the
Baskerville-Emin formula
 

 

 

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SUMMER BREW

DON'T GET BURNED

(Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva)

Obliquebanded Leafroller

   According to our developmental models, the first summer brood should be closing in on completing its hatch throughout the state this week.  Orchards with historically high OBLR pressure should have received a first application of a suitable material during the first week of July, and this week would be an advisable time to make a second application against the larvae of this brood.  Spintor is an appropriate choice, particularly in cases where the larvae are a bit larger, and a B.t. product such as Dipel, or else the IGR Intrepid are also options, but these tend to be more effective when applied against the earlier stages.  Regardless, we have found that this specific spray is the most critical for preventing fruit-feeding damage at harvest, so put this at the top of your list of priorities if OBLR has dogged you in the past.

Apple Maggot

   Trap catches in the state are building steadily, and the combination of heat plus adequate (!) moisture assures us a very respectable flight this season.  If you aren't monitoring in specific orchards and haven't yet applied a protective spray against AM (and aren't using SpinTor for OBLR), prudence would suggest some attention to this pest.  Hanging a few volatile-baited sphere traps on the edge of susceptible plantings can provide a world of insight on when (and whether) immigrating flies are posing a threat.  Growers on a SpinTor program should be somewhere between the first and second spray of this material for leafrollers, which will provide protection against moderate AM pressure.  For those not using OP cover sprays, Assail and Calypso will both provide excellent control of apple maggot as well as internal leps.

Western Flower Thrips

   This formerly rare pest has been a recent cause of damage to nectarines and peaches in the Hudson Valley.  Originally limited to western North America, this is now a cosmopolitan species that is a key pest in the greenhouse production of flowers and vegetables.  Apparently, drought conditions and high temperatures encourage damaging populations that can affect stone fruit crops, particularly nectarines and peaches.  The following information is taken from the PA Tree Fruit Production Guide: "...just prior to and during harvest,...adults move from alternate weed or crop hosts to fruit.  [They] feed on the fruit surface in protected sites, such as in the stem end, the suture, under leaves and branches, and between fruit.  Feeding ...results in silver stipling or patches. 

Silvering injury is particularly obvious on highly colored varieties.  Because Lannate has a short preharvest interval (4 days), it can be used to control thrips during harvest."  Also, SpinTor can be used within 14 days of harvest.  An application after the first harvest may prevent subsequent losses; however, an additional application may be needed if thrips pressure is severe.

Mites

   European red mite eggs are present on the foliage right now, and with our sultry temperatures, the period from egg deposit to hatch and multiply is a very short one.  A few orchards we have seen are in ERM trouble so far, but also keep in mind the potential for two-spotted mite, which can reach alarming levels in a hurry under high-temperature conditions.  Inspect your leaves using the 5 mite/leaf form on p. 83 of the Recommends, and be aware that two-spot populations increase more quickly than ERM, so be conservative in your interpretations.  Zeal and Kanemite are good options to keep in mind if treatment is needed; Acramite tends to be more effective against TSSM than ERM, and Nexter works better against red mites than it does on two-spots, but the main advice is to get out there and look at your foliage.

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This material is based upon work supported by Smith Lever funds from the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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