Cornell University InsigniaCornell University New York State Agricultural Experiment Station
 

 
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August 27, 2007 Volume 16 No. 24 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development
 

 
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Scaffolds 07 index

Upcoming Events
Current DD accumulations
43°F
50°F
(Geneva 1/1-8/27):

2967

2054

(Geneva 1/1-8/27/2006):

3065

2108

(Geneva "Normal" 1/1-8/27):

2955

2000

(Geneva 1/1-9/3/2007, predicted):

3188

2219

(Highland 3/1-8/27/2007):

3207

2310

 

Coming Events:

Ranges:

 

Apple maggot flight subsides

2772-3374

1908-2368

Codling moth 2nd flight subsides

2859-3583

1944-2536

Lesser appleworm 2nd flight peak

2159-3213

1443-2229

Lesser appleworm 2nd flight subsides

2883-3467

1973-2387

Obliquebanded leafroller 2nd flight peak

2620-3016

1784-2108

Oriental fruit moth 3rd flight peak

2641-3249

1821-2257

Oriental fruit moth 3rd flight subsides

2962-3381

2000-2288

Peachtree borer flight subsides

2523-3157

1708-2202

Redbanded leafroller 3rd flight peak

2761-3249

1899-2337

San Jose scale 2nd flight subsides

2639-3349

1785-2371

Spotted tentiform leafminer 3rd flight peak

2606-3050

1782-2124

 

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Trap Catches

Upcoming Events | Trap Catches | Insects | General Info

Geneva

8/17

8/20

8/23

8/27

Redbanded Leafroller

1.5

0.3

1.0

3.5

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

17.3

5.5

3.7

5.5

Oriental Fruit Moth

2.6

1.0

1.3

3.3

Lesser Appleworm

0.6

0.0

0.8

0.9

San Jose scale

96.9

65.8

55.8

39.4

American Plum Borer

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

Lesser Peachtree Borer

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Peachtree Borer

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Apple maggot

0.9

1.7

2.0

0.8

 

 

 

 

 

Highland (Peter Jentsch)

7/26

8/6

8/13

8/20

Redbanded Leafroller

1.5

0.4

0.5

1.9

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

20.3

26.9

22.4

12.9

Oriental Fruit Moth

1.8

2.3

2.7

1.9

Codling Moth

4.2

2.4

0.9

0.4

Lesser Appleworm

2.3

3.9

5.2

2.1

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.0

0.7*

0.0

0.0

Variegated Leafroller

0.0

0.2

0.1

0.3

Apple Maggot

3.7

0.5

0.9

0.5

Tufted apple budmoth

0.0

0.1

0.0

0.0

Redbanded Leafroller

1.9

2.3

0.8

1.5

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

4.5

10.7

11.8

17.3

Oriental Fruit Moth

1.6

1.3

1.4

2.6

Lesser Appleworm

0.0

0.0

0.4*

0.6

San Jose scale

472

558

200

96.9

American Plum Borer

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.0

Lesser Peachtree Borer

0.3

0.0

0.0

0.1

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.0

0.3*

0.0

0.0

Dogwood Borer

-

0.0

-

0.0

Peachtree Borer

0.0

0.3

0.1

0.0

Apple maggot

0.8

1.8

1.3

0.9

  * = 1st catch

 

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Insects

Upcoming Events | Trap Catches | Insects | General Info

LAST TRACE

ORCHARD RADAR DIGEST

Geneva Predictions:
Codling Moth
Codling moth development as of August 27: 2nd generation adult emergence at 100% and 2nd generation egg hatch at 93%.

[NOTE: Consult our mini expert system for arthropod pest management, the
Apple Pest Degree Day Calculator:
http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ipm/specware/newa/appledd.php
Find accumulated degree days between dates with the
Degree Day Calculator:
http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ipm/specware/newa/
Powered by the NYS IPM Program’s NEWA weather data and the Baskerville-Emin formula]

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INSECT BITES

LAST LICKS
(Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva)

   This season has been more hot and dry than last year, a situation that opened up the potential for outbreaks from some typical warm-weather pests.  However, most arthropod pest problems have been fairly well attended to by NY growers, so surprises and crisis infestations have been relatively few.  As the harvest approaches, we're nearly done with the last of the pest management duties.

   Of greatest potential concern are the internal leps, which have been plentiful enough in the normal trouble spots, and there are still oriental fruit moths and even a few codling moths flying in some blocks.  Therefore, to be cautious, we're not ruling out the possibility that blocks with a history of internal worm problems might need a last-minute application of a short-PHI material to help stave off the final feeding injury caused by young larvae.  Before the harvest period begins in earnest, a fruit examination could help determine whether the last brood of any of the likely species needs a final deterrent before the sprayer is put away.  Some thought might be given to using an alternative material such as a B.t., a pyrethroid, Calypso, Assail, or a sprayable pheromone, as appropriate (watch your PHIs).

   Another season-end problem that may deserve attention now is pearleaf blister mite, a sporadic pest of pears that shows up in a limited number of commercial pear orchards and is a fairly common problem in home plantings.  The adults are very small and cannot be seen without a hand lens; the body is white and elongate oval in shape, like a tiny sausage.  The mite causes three distinct types of damage.  During winter, the feeding of the mites under the bud scales is believed to cause the bud to dry and fail to develop.  This type of damage is similar to and may be confused with bud injury from insufficient winter chilling.  Fruit damage is the most serious aspect of blister mite attack.  It occurs as a result of mites feeding on the developing pears, from the green-tip stage through bloom, causing russet spots.  These spots, which are often oval in shape, are usually depressed with a surrounding halo of clear tissue.  They are 1/4-1/2 inch in diameter and frequently run together.  A third type of injury is the blistering of leaves; blisters are 1/8-1/4 inch across and, if numerous, can blacken most of the leaf surface.  Although defoliation does not occur, leaf function can be seriously impaired by a heavy infestation.

   The mite begins overwintering as an adult beneath bud scales of fruit and leaf buds, with fruit buds preferred.  When buds start to grow in the spring, the mites attack developing fruit and emerging leaves.  This produces red blisters in which female blister mites then lay eggs.  These resulting new colonies of mites feed on the tissue within the protection of the blister, but they can move in and out through a small hole in its center.  The mites pass through several generations on the leaves but their activity slows during the warm summer months.  The red color of the blisters fades and eventually blackens.  Before leaf fall, the mites leave the blisters and migrate to the buds for the winter.

   For those plantings that might be suffering from this errant pest, a fall spray is recommended sometime in early October, when there is no danger of frost for at least 24-48 hr after the spray.  Use Sevin 50 WP (2 lb/100), or 1-1.5% oil plus either Diazinon 50WP (1 lb/100 gal) or Thionex 50WP (1/2-1 lb/100 gal).  A second spray of oil plus Thionex, in the spring, just before the green tissue begins to show, will improve the control.

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General Info

Upcoming Events | Trap Catches | Insects | General Info

FRUITS OF OUR LABOR

Final Reminder — Tree Fruit Pest Control Field Day

   Please remember to make plans to attend this year's N.Y. Fruit Pest Control Field Day, which will take place during Labor Day week on Sept. 5 and 6.  The Geneva installment will take place first (Wednesday Sept. 5), with the Hudson Valley segment on the second day (Thursday Sept. 6).  Activities will commence in Geneva on the 5th, with registration, coffee, etc., in the lobby of Barton Lab at 8:30 am.

[NOTE: Collier Dr., the entry road adjacent to Barton Lab, is under repair and will probably still be closed off, so it will be easier to drive into the Station using the Pre-Emption Rd. entrance closest to the Ag Tech Park, and then take the southern road around the back of the greenhouses to get to the Barton parking lot.] 

   The tour will proceed to the orchards to view plots and preliminary data from field trials involving new fungicides, bactericides, miticides, and insecticides on tree fruits and grapes.  It is anticipated that the tour of field plots will be completed by noon.  On the 6th, participants will register at the Hudson Valley Laboratory starting at 8:30, after which we will view and discuss results from field trials on apples/pears.

 


This material is based upon work supported by Smith Lever funds from the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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