Cornell University InsigniaCornell University New York State Agricultural Experiment Station
 

 
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June 9, 2008 Volume 17 No. 12 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development
 

 

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Upcoming Events

Current DD accumulations

43F

50F

(Geneva 1/1-6/9)

910

539

(Geneva 1/1-6/9/2007):

900

549

(Geneva "Normal"):

886

519

(Geneva 1/1-6/16 Predicted):

1089

676

(Highland 3/1-6/9/08):

910

510

 

Coming Events: Ranges
(Normal +/- Std Dev):

Codling moth 1st flight peak

599-989

325-581

Dogwood borer 1st trap catch

810-1368

462-842

European red mite summer egg hatch

737-923

424-572

Obliquebanded leafroller 1st flight peak

904-1322

538-834

Oriental fruit moth 1st flight subsides

827-1269

484-804

Pandemis leafroller flight peak

863-1167

491-707

Peachtree borer 1st catch

788-1360

450-842

Pear psylla summer 2nd brood eggs hatch

967-1185

584-750

Rose leafhopper adults on apple

809-1053

440-662

San Jose scale 1st flight subsides

850-1202

507-741

Spotted tentiform leafminer 1st flight subsides

663-943

360-566

Spotted tentiform leafminer 2nd flight begins

958-1188

564-742

Pest Focus
Geneva:

1st Pandemis Leafroller and Obliquebanded Leafroller trap catches today, 6/9.

   
Highland:

Obliquebanded Leafroller 1st trap catch 6/6.
Plum Curculio DD model initiated at petal fall.  So far, 288 DD have accumulated.
San Jose Scale model predicts crawler emergence, and the need for control, on 6/8.
Rose Leafhopper and White Apple Leafhopper caught in traps.
Pear Psylla 2nd generation nymphs on pears.

 

Trap Catches

Geneva

5/26

6/2

6/5

6/9

Redbanded Leafroller

0.0

0.4

0.2

0.3

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

3.0

3.0

0.8

0.8

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.4

0.1

0.0

0.3

American Plum Borer

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.4

Lesser Peachtree Borer

0.1

0.3

0.8

0.0

Lesser Appleworm

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

San Jose Scale

9.3*

9.1

6.2

3.3

Codling Moth

0.5*

0.3

0.2

0.1

Pandemis Leafroller

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.5*

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.8*

 

 

 

 

 

Highland (Peter Jentsch)

5/19

5/26

6/2

6/9

Redbanded Leafroller

0.9

0.4

0.1

0.0

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

6.0

3.0

0.0

1.1

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.4

0.6

0.1

0.0

Codling Moth

0.5

2.4

2.7

1.4

Lesser Appleworm

0.4

0.6

0.6

0.8

Obliquebanded Leafroller

-

-

0.0

0.6

 

* = 1st catch

Insects
HEAT
INDEX

ORCHARD RADAR DIGEST

Geneva Predictions:
Roundheaded Appletree Borer
Peak emergence: June 9.
RAB egglaying begins: June 7. Peak egglaying period roughly: June 23 to July 7.

Codling Moth
Codling moth development as of June 9: 1st generation adult emergence at 50% and 1st generation egg hatch at 2%
1st generation 3% CM egg hatch: June 10 (= target date for first spray where multiple sprays needed to control 1st generation CM).
1st generation 20% CM egg hatch: June 15 (= target date where one spray needed to control 1st generation codling moth).

Obliquebanded Leafroller
1st generation OBLR flight, first trap catch expected: June 8.

San Jose Scale
1st generation SJS crawlers appear: June 15.

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer
2nd STLM flight begins around: June 13.



 

MODEL BUILDING

    We've been getting some unexplained inconsistencies in our degree day values when calculated using different methods using the temperature data on the NEWA website.  For some reason, the values obtained using the Apple Pest DD Calculator are some 14–18% higher than the results from pasting the daily raw temperature and accumulated DD values into Excel and summing them manually.  Until we can determine the reason for this anomaly, below are the Codling Moth values obtained as of 6/9 using each method.  Remember, these are only intended as a guideline, but our aim is to provide information that anyone would expect to get by going through this exercise themselves:

Codling Moth (targeted spray application at newly hatching larvae, predicted at 250-360 DD base 50°F after biofix):

Location  
Biofix
 
Apple Pest
DD Calculator
 
Excel
Spreadsheet

Albion (Orleans Co.)

 

May 20

 

275

 

238

Appleton-S (Niagara Co.)

 

May 28

 

210

 

185

Brockport

 

May 15

 

---

 

257

Clifton Park

 

May 17

 

254

 

 

Clintondale

 

May 11

 

319

 

 

Geneva

 

May 12

 

325

 

 

Knowlesville (Orleans Co.)

 

May 28

 

220

 

 

Red Hook (Dutchess Co.)

 

May 14

 

379

 

 

Sodus (high-pressure site)

 

May 14

 

285

 

282

Sodus (low-pressure site)

 

May 20

 

---

 

260

Waterport (Orleans Co.)

 

May 20

 

281

 

245

Williamson

 

May 12

 

304

 

257

Plum Curculio (spray coverage required until 308 DD base 50°F after biofix; i.e., McIntosh petal fall):

Location  
Biofix
 
DD (as of 6/9)

Albion (Orleans Co.)

 

May 16

 

292

Appleton-S (Niagara Co.)

 

May 23

 

255

Clifton Pk (Saratoga Co.)

 

May 10

 

315

Clintondale (Ulster Co.)

 

May 8

 

339

Geneva

 

May 14

 

313

Highland

 

May 14

 

288

Knowlesville (Orleans Co.)

 

May 16

 

285

Red Hook (Dutchess Co.)

 

May 9

 

410

Sodus

 

May 16

 

273

Williamson

 

May 21

 

267

[NOTE: Consult our mini expert system for arthropod pest management, the
Apple Pest Degree Day Calculator:
http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ipm/specware/newa/appledd.php
Find accumulated degree days between dates with the
Degree Day Calculator:
http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ipm/specware/newa/
Powered by the NYS IPM Program’s NEWA weather data and the Baskerville-Emin formula]


PLAYING CATCH-UP

MADE GLORIOUS SUMMER
(Art Agnello, and Dave Kain, Entomology, Geneva)

    Evidently it's safe to assume that all of the region's late spring cold cells have finally worked their way out of the system for the year, and the solid stretch of 90-degree temperatures should have done a decent job of collecting all of the straggling, out-of-sync insect populations and putting them somewhat onto a comparable (not to say "normal") time schedule heading into early summer.  We still seem to be running about a week ahead of most seasons regarding pest and crop development, but at least things in one part of the state are starting to resemble those in another part.

    Firstly, plum curculio, which previously looked to be heading for a long entrenchment, should now progress very rapidly through whatever portion of its orchard-immigration and egg-laying activity is still remaining to be expended.  According to the heat unit models, most western NY sites will get to the oviposition cutoff date this week, and in the Hudson Valley, most have already passed it.  It seems that a majority of the 1st cover sprays will have been applied by the end of the week, so that should effectively end the need for any further protection against this year's PC population.

    Internal leps are somewhat of a different story.  Preventive sprays against our earlybird OFM populations should have gone on by now, and moth catches from the first generation are already starting to decline.  Codling moth emergence was a bit fragmented as a result of the prolonged cool temperatures during the middle of May, so their 1st brood egg hatch is just getting under way now.  This means that those growers specifically targeting this species should probably spray this week and then follow up in about 10–14 days, placing this window squarely in between the ones for plum curculio and obliquebanded leafroller.  This moves us distinctly back towards the practice of applying bi-weekly cover sprays, but that's the way things have turned out so far this season.

    Other arthropods of note include aphids, leafrollers and mites, none of which have I noted specifically yet, but all of these should be showing their beady little eyes very soon given the continuing heat.  Jim Eve notes that aphids are beginning to appear in Wayne Co., including green peach and black cherry aphids, so some foliar inspection in stone fruit blocks would be advised.  We had our first OBLR moth catch in Geneva today (the Hudson Valley recorded theirs last week), and weather like this can't help but boost mite numbers, so please take a moment to have a look for these up-and-comers, so that you won't be surprised when they do what comes naturally.

Chem News
SUPER!

DELEGATE APPROVED FOR NY USE
(Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva)

    Last Friday, the NYS DEC approved the Dow AgroSciences application for a Section 24(c) Special Local Need (SLN) label for the use of Delegate 25WG (EPA Reg. No. 62719-541) to control codling moth and oriental fruit moth on apples.  This product contains the active ingredient spinetoram, which is a new member of the spinosyn class of insecticides; this class also includes spinosad, the a.i. in Spintor and Entrust.  It is derived from the fermentation of a naturally occurring soil bacterium, Saccharopolyspora spinosa.  Spinetoram is derived from different spinosyn components that have been chemically modified to give it improved insecticidal activity and greater photostability than spinosad.  In addition to enhanced activity against OBLR, Delegate also exhibits high efficacy against the internal lep species; however, this SLN label allows its use only for CM and OFM.  The full state label, which includes OBLR and other species, is still under review by the DEC.

    In the control of CM, Delegate exhibits residual efficacy equivalent to that of azinphosmethyl.  However, it is classified as a Reduced Risk pesticide, and its environmental profile and fate are similar to those of Spintor.  Residues aged for 3 hr are practically nontoxic to honey bees, and it exhibits a low impact on key beneficial arthropods.  Delegate has been found to be toxic to predatory mites and parasitoids in acute laboratory tests, but under field conditions, any effects on beneficial species are slight and transitory.  This product represents an important new tool in the management programs of growers faced with increasingly problematic internal lep infestations in their apples.

    The SLN label specifies an application rate of 4.5-6.0 oz of product per acre, with a maximum of 2 applications (12 oz of product max) allowed this season.  Delegate has an REI of 4 hrs, and a PHI of 7 days.  Bear in mind that a copy of the SLN label must be in the possession of the user at the time of application.  Dow anticipates that there will be product delivered to NY distributors within the next 7 days.

 

GENERAL INFO
FINAL
SHOWING

REMINDER OF TOWER AND SENSORS FIELD DEMONSTRATIONS
(Andrew Landers, Entomology, Geneva)

    There will be one final demonstration that will showcase equipment that was purchased through a USDA Conservation Innovation Grant.  The purpose of this grant was to bring a new concept or technology to an area that will reduce environmental impact and increase profitability for agriculture producers.  Ten Farmers received cost-share to purchase ten new sprayers in 2007.  The District is hoping this program will lead to more cost–share opportunities in the future for farmers to purchase conservation type equipment.

June 10, 2008 at 10:00 am, Lynn Oaken Farms, Alps Road, Town of Yates.

 

Oaks Farm

 

 


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