Cornell University InsigniaCornell University New York State Agricultural Experiment Station
 

 
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August 4, 2008 Volume 17 No. 20 Update on Pest Management and Crop Development
 

 

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Upcoming Events

Current DD accumulations

43F

50F

(Geneva 1/1-8/4):

2384

1611

(Geneva 1/1-8/4/2007):

2366

1613

(Geneva "Normal"):

2381

1587

(Geneva 1/1-8/11 Predicted):

2575

1753

 

Coming Events: Ranges
(Normal +/- Std Dev):

American plum borer 2nd flight peak

1956-2454

1311-1701

Apple maggot flight peak

2118-2570

1021-1495

Codling moth 2nd flight peak

2005-2835

1337-1977

Comstock mealybug 2nd gen crawlers emerge

2234-2624

1505-1781

Lesser appleworm 2nd flight peak

2197-3217

1471-2233

Oriental fruit moth 2nd flight subsides

2067-2533

1379-1771

Oriental fruit moth 3rd flight begins

2349-2753

1606-1902

Redbanded leafroller 2nd flight subsides

2190-2706

1485-1875

San Jose scale 2nd flight peak

2102-2513

1422-1764

Spotted tentiform leafminer 2nd flight subsides

2022-2436

1339-1697

Spotted tentiform leafminer 3rd flight begins

2286-2668

1531-1881

Pest Focus
Geneva: Obliquebanded Leafroller 1st catch of 2nd flight today, 8/4.    

 

Trap Catches

Geneva

7/24

7/28

7/31

8/4

Redbanded Leafroller

1.2

3.0

1.2

0.6

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

15.3

10.3

9.7

5.6

Oriental Fruit Moth

0.2

0.1

1.3

0.3

American Plum Borer

0.3

0.5

0.3

0.0

Lesser Peachtree Borer

0.0

0.0

0.3

0.0

Lesser Appleworm

0.2

0.4

0.5

0.3

San Jose Scale

305

925

2250

2815

Codling Moth

0.0

0.3

0.0

0.3

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.3*

Peachtree Borer

0.0

0.0

0.2

0.0

Apple Maggot

20.0

6.1

11.7

7.0

 

 

 

 

 

Highland (Peter Jentsch)

7/7

7/14

7/21

7/28

Redbanded Leafroller

0.3

0.0

0.1

0.1

Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

39.1

22.4

Oriental Fruit Moth

3.2

1.1

0.8

0.8

Codling Moth

0.6

1.9

1.3

2.4

Lesser Appleworm

1.2

2.0

3.6

2.3

Obliquebanded Leafroller

0.4

0.4

0.1

0.3

Tufted Apple Budmoth

0.3

0.0

0.0

0.2

Fruittree Leafroller

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

Apple Maggot

0.1

0.3

0.4

0.5

Lesser Peachtree Borer

0.6

0.1

0.1

0.3

Dogwood Borer

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.4

* = 1st catch

Insects
IT'S
WANING
INSECTS

ORCHARD RADAR DIGEST

Geneva Predictions:
Codling Moth
Codling moth development as of August 4: 2nd generation adult emergence at 53% and 2nd generation egg hatch at 16%.
2nd generation 30% CM egg hatch: August 9 (= target date where one spray needed to control 2nd generation CM).

White Apple Leafhopper
2nd generation WALH found on apple foliage: August 4.


 

MODEL BUILDING

Codling Moth (Treatment period for the 2nd generation starts at 1260 DD base 50°F after biofix):

Location  

Biofix

 

DD (as of 8/4)

Albion

 

May 20

 

1433

Appleton-S

 

May 28

 

1298

Clifton Park

 

May 17

 

1415

Clintondale

 

May 11

 

1428

Geneva

 

May 12

 

1433

Knowlesville

 

May 28

 

1346

Red Hook

 

May 14

 

1749

Sodus

 

May 14

 

1242
(as of 8/1)

Waterport

 

May 20

 

1486

Williamson

 

May 12

 

1372

[NOTE: Consult our mini expert system for arthropod pest management, the
Apple Pest Degree Day Calculator:
http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ipm/specware/newa/appledd.php
Find accumulated degree days between dates with the
Degree Day Calculator:
http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ipm/specware/newa/
Powered by the NYS IPM Program’s NEWA weather data and the Baskerville-Emin formula]


 

THE END'S
IN SIGHT

THE VIEW FROM MIDSUMMER
(Art Agnello, Entomology, Geneva)

       Most of the season's pest control decisions are likely to be completed this week and next.  As you prepare to make what will possibly be your final turn through the orchard for crop protection purposes before starting to concentrate on harvest activities, try to keep alert to any late-breaking pest developments that might be expected during this less-than-typical summer.  Forecast weather trends fortunately appear to be moderate in terms of heat and rain, which should not overly promote increased insect activity beyond a 'normal' level.  However, here's a quick rundown of some of the more important August pests to keep in mind during this homestretch.

Apple Maggot
   Adult numbers have been fairly high in the orchard sites where we're trapping for them this year.  In historically high-pressure orchards, mid-August is the most active period for flies to be out and laying eggs.  As always, localized trapping can pay off in the event that some blocks are under greater pressure than others, even on the same farm, so please continue to monitor traps in representative blocks. 

Internal Lepidoptera
   This complex of fruit-feeding larvae continues to pose a threat in several problem sites.  High numbers of first-generation OFM and CM moths have given rise in some areas to healthy second flights, so it pays to stay on top of the situation in your specific orchard.  Some spots with fruit damage are known, but in general, most orchards look to be in good shape.

   Conditions are still favorable for good August flights, particularly for codling moth.  All areas of the state have reached and surpassed the initiation of 2nd generation egg hatch, which signals the timing for control sprays against the smallest larvae.  This is an appropriate window for management sprays of oriental fruit moth as well, so prudence would dictate a critical evaluation of your late-season fruit protection status, to be sure you are adequately covered until the PHI for the various respective varieties.

   For now, we're recommending that problem sites be kept covered with at least another spray, and we'll see what the tail end of the pre-harvest period looks like.  Options include Asana, Assail, Baythroid, Guthion, Imidan, Leverage, Proaxis or Warrior in peaches.  In apples and pears, you can use Asana, Assail, Avaunt, Baythroid, Calypso, Danitol, Delegate, Guthion, Imidan, Proaxis, or Warrior; most of the non-OP materials will additionally give control of white apple leafhopper.  This is additionally the suitable time for Cyd-X or Carpovirusine applications against codling moth.  For control of OFM, alternate row middle applications will not be as effective as whole orchard sprays in high pressure blocks.  Assess the pressure in your specific situations, check the pre-harvest intervals, and determine whether a full or border spray might be in order.

European Corn Borer
   Recall that these moths have a final flight that extends to the middle of September, and that the offspring can inflict last-minute fruit feeding damage to later varieties.  One or two late sprays of a B.t. product like Dipel can go a long ways toward minimizing this injury, and the 0-day PHI is compatible with any harvest schedule.  Also, SpinTor applied against late season leafrollers will provide incidental corn borer control (PHI = 7 days).

Mites
   It can't be said often enough that mites are extremely good at exploiting any high temps to pump out a few more generations before they call it quits for the winter; twospotted spider mites are also possible, including in peach plantings.  A frequent (weekly) perusal of your foliage can pay off big dividends if they happen to build rapidly before the crop is fully mature.

Obliquebanded Leafroller
   The second summer flight of OBLR is due to start any time now, which means that the first larvae will be out looking for a snack by the 2nd to 3rd week of August.  If you struggled to manage the 1st summer brood, you might also cast a judicious eye on your fruits while you're in there checking the leaves for mites, to determine whether a late application of SpinTor, Proclaim, or a B.t. material such as Dipel, Deliver or Biobit might be of use in heading off late-season feeding damage.

And don't forget...
       Review the comments in last week's issue regarding management options for Comstock mealybug (particularly in pears) and woolly apple aphid, which are still both on the job.

 


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